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November 17 2016 @ 06:00 am
Thankful Day 17: Where I Live  
Where I Live
Don't get me wrong, living in a rural area has many downsides. One of them being the lack of public transportation. Another a lack of single men. Sad but true. But something we have here that you don't find it a city is wide opened spaces. And the lovely creatures you can find there. These ladies live behind me and they adore apples. They are both pretty lovable though the one on the left is a little more picky about how much love she'll endure. Righty doesn't much care as long as it is plenty.

I don't know their names as of yet but I feel like calling them Laverne (Right) and Shirley (Left) until I find out their real names.

They are not the only creatures we have here in abundance. We've got lots of chickens, raccoons, wild turkeys, skunks (yeah you don't want to meet those), some bears (higher up the mountain), lots of deer, opossum, emu, alpacas, sheep, goats and cows!
Some are friendlier than others though generally they don't let you get to close.



Here is a baby deer eating the leaves of the low branches of our tree. There are nearly a dozen who live right behind us and wander into our yard nearly daily. They are quite beautiful to see and when they notice you some just look at you in wonderment while the older ones tend to leap away.

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Here we also have a historic cabin where Mark Twain lived while he wrote his story about our town.
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The Discovery Tree Stump. This huge tree was cut down by an entrepreneur in 1853 who concocted a plan to take the thick bark (just the bark!) on a worldwide exhibition and charge admission. He ran into a problem, though: it was all thought to be a hoax and people didn’t believe a tree could be that large. The stump itself soon afterwards did become a tourist attraction.

And up the mountain as you drive the trees get bigger and taller as we have the largest trees in the world (height wise generally, giant sequoias tend to be tall but more wide) the Sierra Redwoods. There aren't a lot of ancient trees like this but as you walk the trails you see tons of big trees both fallen and living.

I haven't lived here my whole life. I moved here when I was 14 right after my first year of high school which was the best year actually. I'd been here many times because of all the family. We used to visit in the summer and sometimes at Christmas. I grew up in Southern California in a city. Not Los Angeles, Ontario actually. I was used to walking over a couple streets and there being shops, drugstores, video stores, fast food. I walked 2 miles to school... literally that was the mileage from my house to my high school when in Southern California. Now it would be 5 miles of walking along a mild of nowhere highway to get to the high school instead of homes, stores and a police station along the way. Needless to say, it was something of a culture shock and yet I'm very happy about where I live. I do miss friendly neighbors who like to chat... cows just aren't that talkative but the people here are nice and life just tends to be simpler and less rushed.


What are you grateful for today?
thoughtful
thoughtful
 
 
 

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tracyj23tracyj23 on November 17th, 2016 03:16 pm (UTC)
Very cool. So very different from me. I live right in the centre of a city of 800,000 people. There are 5 buses within a 3 house walking distance, 10 restaurants within 2 blocks, a grocery store, a drugstore, a multitude of shops, a hospital half a block away ... and the only "wild" animals are crows, pigeons, squirrels (in abundance thanks to our 80+ year old trees), racoons and the occasional skunk. Oh, and mice. They live outside all summer but try to find ways inside in winter so we always have to make sure there are no cracks or holes anywhere in the foundation of our house or they'll be in the basement. We've had that happen before ...

I'm thankful for where I live too. Where my kids go to school and where I work is 2 km away and a 5 minute bus ride. Can't get much better than that!
Jill aka Jo: TP: Pretender Jarodsireesanwar on November 17th, 2016 06:30 pm (UTC)
That is very different. Sometimes I feel like there is no place here for people to go because it just seems that way. There are lots of shops and we have some good restaurants but the things is that everything is a distance away. We think nothing of driving 30 miles for a good restaurant because that is just where they are.

We have field mice too. When my indoor kitties died they were everywhere and then came the outdoor kitties and we haven't had one.

Great! Sometimes it just isn't something we think of being thankful for.

Edited at 2016-11-17 06:31 pm (UTC)
Jo Ann: Autumn: Ctry road-tree-fence-blue skyyeuxdebleu on November 18th, 2016 01:06 am (UTC)
I have experienced culture shock several times in my life. I grew up on a 400-acre farm in Ohio then moved immediately after college graduation to NYC.
Quite a shock, but I loved all the activity of the city. Then in 1990, we moved to rural, northern NH. It was beautiful and peaceful after NYC, but it meant no Broadband, no bookstores, no movie theaters, no good restaurants...at least not unless you we willing to drive over an hour.

It's better now with Amazon, satellite TV, satellite Broadband, DVDs and Netflix. We'll be caught up to the rest of the country in another 25 years, or so. *snork*

Edited at 2016-11-18 01:08 am (UTC)
Jill aka Jo: Hug: Stock drawing on fingerssireesanwar on November 19th, 2016 12:43 am (UTC)
Wow from one extreme to another! I'm glad we don't have to go an hour for a good restaurant but sometimes that is the case. We are usually willing; however, because sometimes it means getting away and stocking up as well.

I can't imagine moving into NYC. That would be the biggest culture shock within the US I'd think. Even being in San Francisco is vastly different than NYC and I abhor going into SF because people there are just nuts. It is like there are no traffic laws.

Well, I hope civilization encroaches a little and sooner. *wink*

PS: I've missed you being around. Granted I haven't been around a ton but still I've barely seen your username pop up anywhere. *squishes*
Kaylee Winchesterroguem on November 21st, 2016 10:40 am (UTC)
I grew up in a small town and ended up moving to the city in my late teens. Both places has it's virtues, but I was happy with the move.
Jill aka Jo: Stock: be an owlsireesanwar on December 2nd, 2016 01:28 am (UTC)
I can imagine. Sometimes there is just nothing like being in the city. But after living in one growing up and then moving here... I like the space. But I'd like to live just outside of a normal sized city... not like NY or San Francisco that are huge cities.
Kaylee Winchesterroguem on December 13th, 2016 05:54 pm (UTC)
I'm pretty sure Kristiansand would be considered a town by American standards, but I have all I need here, so I'm happy.
Jill aka Josireesanwar on December 13th, 2016 08:17 pm (UTC)
Our town is just that. I mean I believe it is actually a city but it is very small so I call it a town. LOL